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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
to realize that this is our katrina. >> the obama administration responded to complaints that fema was late on the scene and anountsed that the deputy administrator will be there tomorrow and fema wants everyone who needs assistance to call. when there's complaintcomplaint because they haven't been able to reach out. 1- 800-621-fema or disast disasterassistance.gov. >>> president obama was back on the trail. >> in new jersey yesterday and saw the devastation and you really get a sense of how difficult this is going to be for a lot of people. but you know, we've been inspired these past few days. because when disaster strikes, we see america at its best. the consumer in these times all seem to melt away. there are no democrats or republicans during the storm. just fellow americans. >> his response to the storm has earned him big praise. 78% approve of how he's dealt with the hurricane. images and headlines like this have helped, too, featuring chris christie of new jersey on a bipartisan storm damage tour together from wednesday. but not everyone's a fan of the federal agencies that handle
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
here. the same group that went to the gulf coast following hurricane katrina. the navy is bringing in pumps that they normally use on ships. i want it draw attention to the building behind me. it is staten island ferry entrance. currently all services are suspended indefinitely. the police tape is up by the battery park underpass. because as you can see 50 feet of water is still there. limited subway service began before 6:00 today. mta says 5.5 million people daily right on their subways. they also say any day that their trains are not running it costs them $18 million in revenue. traffic has been a mess throughout the city because of lack of people not being able to use public transportation and road closures. they're making three occupants or more are in each vehicle if they're going over the four east river bridges. they won't get a ticket but they won't let people through if they don't have three people in there. also the area around where the crane collapsed in midtown is still frozen. we heard from the mayor bloomberg and he is saying that that is going to be weekend before
from the corps of engineers a special team that pumps and they worked in katrina. they are onsite. we are showing them the situation and they are assessing it. we want to pump out the water to see what is going on in the tunnels and that will help us get the power back. >>reporter: the most difficult question, timetable, your best projection when new york city will return to the new york city we all remember. >>guest: is the new york city you remember. it is the new york city you remember today. because it is made up of new yorkers. >>reporter: with working subways. >>guest: well, the new york subway system...the buses have started running this evening limited and will run full service tomorrow. subways will come back in the in few days but the subways don't make new york, new york. >>reporter: i should add, some good news we are told that when the buses are up and running today and tomorrow, they are going to be free. >>shepard: a lot of questions about the power grid in lower manhattan and whether they can supply power to the stock exchange. he clearly cannot hear me. another point
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
in lives and economic damage might be less than katrina. i know our insurance analyst has talked about the size of the liability being half, which is good news. and i think there's going to be some affect on auto sales and consumer retail spending. but, again, if those stocks take a dip, that's going to be a pretty big opportunity. because we know when you have to fix a broken window you end up with more spending. overall, this could be a boost to the economy. i think it's going to be viewed as an opportunity. i think we're seeing in some of the premarket activity. >> i never know really whether to believe that or not. i see with insurance companies and i've seen the case made, the broken window case that you eventually have to fix it. net net, replacing things that may have been -- didn't need replacing and using capital to do that, i can't believe that, you know, spending $20 billion on what you didn't have to do before can be net net be good long-term. is that really true? is that the case that economists make? >> well, i think it depends on how much credit is involved. in other wor
from a katrina, from 9/11 and this happens and it reinforces. guess what, where were those people on 9/11 they were at the tip of manhattan and the same area that's getting hit so hard right now. there are other areas, i came into cbs this morning somebody said i'm up in rockland county, nobody's telling that story. nasa county out on the island, there are places our cameras aren't getting to. so the devastation. >> rose: because there are so many stories. >> that's right. >> rose: thank you very much. back in moment. stay with us. >> rose: al -- al -- al has not poire -- the government is due to change before the year is out with enrique pena becoming president in december. but the challenges facing the country remain the war on the drug cartels in relation with the united states will remain key areas of focus. i'm pleased to have alejandro poir at this table. welcome. >> thank you very much charlie. >> rose: i interviewed calderon, the president for another month i guess, month and-a-half here when he was in town for the clinton global initiative. i raised these questions wit
on a real storm that took real lives. and remember katrina? thousands of people wouldn't or couldn't heed the warning and had to be rescued. so how do we handle any creeping cynicism in the face of sandy? perhaps we take our cues from the movie. >> the storm is going to get worse. we stay inside, we keep warm, and we wait it out. >> you know, the mayor of new york city had a very powerful comment about this. he said if you live in an evacuation area and you refuse to leave, you're not only risking your own life but also the lives of first responders who may have to come and rescue you. lara, back to you. >> thanks so much, dan. >>> coming up next, surviving the storm. everything you need to keep your family safe. and what people in the path of the storm are saying right now. "good morning america" will be right back. maybe you can be there; maybe you can't. when you have migraines with fifteen or more headache days a month, you miss out on your life. you may have chronic migraine. go to mychronicmigraine.com to find a headache specialist. and don't live a maybe life. but the acidic levels
. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toƩ@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jump off of a hurricane. this could be like that. that's how big this one might end up being. >> and very quickly, i'm sure you had heard rumors, reports that potentially the federal government would have to del
for showing up in such large numbers to help out. i remember in my state of massachusetts when katrina hit, some of the people were evacuated from new orleans were brought to massachusetts. we gathered them at a military base on cape cod. they thought they were going to houston, by the way. the plane said that they were going to boston and they were not very happy. we told our citizens that we have people coming here that have been affected by the hurricane if you would like to help by providing supplies and goods that they might need. you know what? there were cars lined up, people dropping off all sorts of goods, some things that were temporary like food. others that were permanent like tv sets, clothes, and it was amazing to see the turn out. it is part of the american way. we have people having hard times because of this terrible hurricane. your generosity will make a difference. i want to thank you. we have work to do. to make this an enjoyable work setting, we have asked a great entertainer, randy owen of alabama to be here. [applause] extraordinary guy. he will probably tell you thi
of liberalism. built on the bones two of disasters wars, the incompetent of the reaction to katrina and a ruin in the economy. four years later, what the hell happened? that's my first question. [laughter] >> that's hey, that's what "pity the billionaire: the hard-times swindle and the unlikely comeback of the right is about. and if you all want to you're going have to read the whole thing. that is in very brief form what the book is about. we came to it four years ago we came to a turning point in the country, we didn't turn. you know, -- [laughter] and before i start blabbing about that. let me say how nice it is to be here in austin, texas thank you for inviting me. it i love a book festival where you can buy a corn dog. [laughter] [applause] that's awesome. okay. but back to the sort of story of our times. to pick up on what president obama was say -- paul was saying in 2008 i live in washington, d.c., now. every pundit in the city was saying conservativism is done. it's days over. we followed the economic recipe. look what happened. not to mention all the substantials, tom delay, the katr
katrina. this is a big risk for president obama. he had to show that he was a leader, minimize damage, look like he was an in get -- look like he was engaged, and by the way, there was an election in a week. he was on the phone with governors and mayors all up and down the eastern seaboard. chris christie, the governor of new jersey, his state was hardest hit. he had made some very favorable comments. over the last couple of months they made some really favorable comments. so, here is a moment in which a president can show great leadership, an opportunity to demonstrate the power of the white house or incumbency, or he can screw it up and bought everything, losing the election because of it. he is probably tilting towards the leadership right now. there have not been any serious critiques of the obama handling of the storm in the aftermath. what is mitt romney to do? he is in this middle place, where there is no role for an opposition candidate. no accepted script for what one of these candidates is supposed to do when one of these storms come along. there is a risk for both sides and
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)